Genocide in Bosnia

Bosnian Genocide, 1992-1995

Posts Tagged ‘Srebrenica Massacre

ICJ Judge, Serbia Was Accomplice in the Srebrenica Genocide

Case: Bosnia v. Serbia
Judgement: Declaration of Judge Keith, the International Court of Justice.

Explanation of vote on complicity — Knowledge of principal’s genocidal intent necessary as a matter of law, but not shared intent — Evidence of aid and assistance established — Evidence of knowledge of the facts underlying the genocidal intent established — Finding of complicity in the genocide committed at Srebrenica. Read the rest of this entry »

ICJ Judge, Serbia Was Complicit in Srebrenica Genocide

Case: Bosnia v. Serbia
Judgement: Declaration of Judge Bennouna, the International Court of Justice.

FRY’s continued presence within the United Nations — Effects of Serbia and Montenegro’s admission to the United Nations on 1 November 2000 — Serbia’s complicity in genocide — Accomplice’s mens rea as opposed to principal perpetrator’s — Relationship between individual criminal liability and State responsibility — Definition of complicity — “Scorpions”, a paramilitary force under Serbian control.

I wish by means of this declaration to expand upon and clarify certain aspects of the Court’s reasoning in reaffirming its jurisdiction to decide this case. I shall then explain why I disagree with the Court’s finding that Serbia was not complicit in the genocide committed at Srebrenica. Read the rest of this entry »

Srebrenica Genocide Started Two Years Before the Massacre

United Nations Security Council Resolution 819, adopted unanimously on April 16, 1993, after reaffirming resolutions 713 (1991) and all (1992) subsequent resolutions, the Council expressed concern at the actions of Bosnian Serb paramilitary units in towns and villages in eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina, including attacks on civilians, the United Nations Protection Force and disruption to humanitarian aid convoys.

The Report of the Security Council Mission, dated 30 April 1993, required Bosnian Serbs refused to withdraw their heavy weapons (to demilitarize) around Srebrenica, which they refused to do: Read the rest of this entry »

Bosnian Genocide Survivor, "I remember my mother's eyes"

To learn more about the 1993 Cerska massacre, browse available documentation on our web site.

Srebrenica Orphans Recall Horror

Lodi News-Sentinel,
p. front, A88 July 1996.

Ferida Osmanovic hanged herself a year ago. She just walked off alone into a quiet wood, leaving behind her two children to fend for themselves.

Her despair was too much to bear. She endured the long siege of Srebrenica. Then came the terrifying end when Bosnian Serbs overran the Muslim enclave. The final horror was seeing the Serbs drag her husband away.

One July later, Osmanovic’s grave in a paupers cemetery is marked by a simple slab of wood inscribed: “No name: Srebrenica.”

Her children know where she is buried and have drawn the hard lessons of war, death and despair. Read the rest of this entry »

Muslims Hanging from Trees After the Fall of Srebrenica

Photo: Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) woman Ferida Osmanovic hanging from a tree after the fall of Srebrenica. Photographed by Darko Bandic. According to the U.S. Dept of State, another 14-year-old Bosniak child hung herself with her scarf in Potocari after she and her 12-year old cousin were raped by Serb soldiers.

Photo: Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) woman Ferida Osmanovic hanging from a tree after the fall of Srebrenica. Photographed by Darko Bandic. According to the U.S. Dept of State, another 14-year-old Bosniak child hung herself with her scarf in Potocari after she and her 12-year old cousin were raped by Serb soldiers.

By STEPHEN KINZER
Published: July 14, 1995.
New York Times

TUZLA, Bosnia and Herzegovina, July 13— Thousands of stunned Muslim refugees streamed into this town in northern Bosnia today, telling of bodies left hanging from trees and littering the street after the Bosnian Serb conquest of the “safe area” of Srebrenica.

Busloads of refugees, many with just the clothes on their backs, continued to arrive late into the night. They camped under a full moon on mosquito-infested fields near the Tuzla airport, trying to come to grips with their sudden losses.

Dozens of refugees interviewed here told similar stories of atrocities. Many said they had hidden fearfully in their homes on Tuesday night, after Bosnian Serbs had entered Srebrenica late Tuesday afternoon with virtually no resistance.

On Wednesday morning, these witnesses said, when Bosnian Serb soldiers routed them out to waiting buses for shipment to Government-held territory, they saw “many men hanging” — words repeatedly used — and many more men lying dead in the streets. There was no independent verification of their accounts.

The refugees said that they had heard some shots during the night but that many of the men had apparently been stabbed to death.

“I saw men who seemed to have gone crazy, killing people with knives,” said Vahida Nukic. “We didn’t know what was happening,” she added.

Some of the refugees also described rapes and abductions of women, notorious weapons of degradation in past episodes of “ethnic cleansing” by the Serbs.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by genocideinbosnia

January 23, 2011 at 6:29 pm

Memories Haunt Bosnian Genocide Death March Survivors

Bosnian Genocide survivors from the conquered Srebrenica arrived in Tuzla on Monday night after seven days of death marches from Srebrenica to Bosnian government held territory. A U.N. truck helped them arrive to Tuzla and look for relatives who have also fled the fallen city.

Bosnian Genocide survivors from the conquered Srebrenica arrived in Tuzla on Monday night after seven days of death marches from Srebrenica to Bosnian government held territory. A U.N. truck helped them arrive to Tuzla and look for relatives who have also fled the fallen city.

Lawrence Journal-World, P.9A
19 July 1995.

Survivors who fled the Bosnian Serb army that bore down on Srebrenica have horror stories to tell and memories that won’t fade soon.

TUZLA, Bosnia-Herzegovina — Bahrem Ektic, 16 and frail, saw dozens of Muslim [Bosniak] men lying dead or dying as he made a seven-day trek to safety from conquered Srebrenica. The memory of one victim will remain with him.

“One had nose and ears cut off, and only two fingers left on each hand. When we passed by, he whimpered. He begged us to kill him. But we could not shoot him, for fear Serbs will hear us. And nobody mustered strength to put him out of his misery with a knife.” Read the rest of this entry »

A very young child, Bosnian Genocide survivor, emerged from mass grave

“And then, suddenly, the shooting stopped. A very young boy emerged from the heap of bodies, covered in blood and mangled flesh. He began walking toward the gunmen, crying for his “Babo” (father). The soldiers lowered their weapons. The commanding officer ordered them to shoot the boy…”

A relentless quest for justice, on international scale

By Adam LeBor — Cynics argue that because the United Nations was unable to stop the carnage in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, it set up war crimes tribunals instead, as a kind of humanitarian consolation prize.

What the diplomats did not expect was Carla Del Ponte’s determination to bring the perpetrators to justice and to end the culture of impunity. As the attorney general of Switzerland, she had fought against the muro di gomma, the wall of rubber, that deflected her attempts to stop Mafia money-laundering. “Madame Prosecutor” is her account of battling the muro di gomma across the Balkans, Rwanda and Western capitals. It is a relentless, sometimes understandably) angry book, and an important insider’s account of the quest for international justice. Each of its 13 chapter titles begins with the word “Confronting,” including “Confronting the Tribunal Bureaucracy,” in which she accuses some of her own officials of obstruction and incompetence. Read the rest of this entry »