Genocide in Bosnia

Bosnian Genocide, 1992-1995

Posts Tagged ‘International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia

A very young child, Bosnian Genocide survivor, emerged from mass grave

“And then, suddenly, the shooting stopped. A very young boy emerged from the heap of bodies, covered in blood and mangled flesh. He began walking toward the gunmen, crying for his “Babo” (father). The soldiers lowered their weapons. The commanding officer ordered them to shoot the boy…”

A relentless quest for justice, on international scale

By Adam LeBor — Cynics argue that because the United Nations was unable to stop the carnage in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, it set up war crimes tribunals instead, as a kind of humanitarian consolation prize.

What the diplomats did not expect was Carla Del Ponte’s determination to bring the perpetrators to justice and to end the culture of impunity. As the attorney general of Switzerland, she had fought against the muro di gomma, the wall of rubber, that deflected her attempts to stop Mafia money-laundering. “Madame Prosecutor” is her account of battling the muro di gomma across the Balkans, Rwanda and Western capitals. It is a relentless, sometimes understandably) angry book, and an important insider’s account of the quest for international justice. Each of its 13 chapter titles begins with the word “Confronting,” including “Confronting the Tribunal Bureaucracy,” in which she accuses some of her own officials of obstruction and incompetence. Read the rest of this entry »