Genocide in Bosnia

Bosnian Genocide, 1992-1995

Posts Tagged ‘Croatia

Meet Baby Emina, Born to Muslim Rape Victim in the Bosnian Genocide

The Spokesman-Review
13 January 1993.

ZAGREB, Croatia — She has no official name, but nurses at Petrova maternity hospital call her Emina [Bosnian Muslim name].

The baby was born in November to 17-year-old Bosniak girl who said she was raped repeatedly during three months in a Serb-run detention camp near Teslic in central Bosnia.

“She didn’t want to see the baby after the birth. She just left,” said Veselko Grizelj, the Zagreb hospital’s chief obstetrician. Where she went, is not known. Grizelj said the dark-haired infant has become the favorite of the hospital staff. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by genocideinbosnia

January 24, 2011 at 7:12 pm

The deafening silence: A Diet of Serbian Imperialism

By Linda Paric
Green Left, Issue #56.
20 May 1992.

On Mother’s Day 1992, my village died. It was killed by Serbian mortars, guns and bombs. It never made the news, just like dozens of Croatian and Muslim villages and towns in Croatia and Bosnia-Hercegovina. It is another Vukovar, Osijek, Mostar, Sarajevo, Ravno, Foca, Visegrad, Vinkovci, Skabrnje, Bijelina, Dalj, Ulice …

Gorice, in north-east Bosnia, had survived 500 years of Turkish occupation, the poverty created by its Serbian landlords since 1914, two world wars and postwar illness and famine.

Like most Croats and Bosniaks in Bosnia-Herzegovina, I grew up on a diet of Serbian imperialism. They were the police, the public servants, the bureaucrats, the politicians and the teachers. Like my brothers before me, I had a Serbian teacher, even though we were all Croatian. He taught us Serbian, under the guise of Serbo-Croat, and gave extra marks if we wrote in Cyrillic script.

Even this was not enough. Only the total destruction of anything that is not Serbian will now satisfy. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by genocideinbosnia

January 19, 2011 at 1:20 pm

Primitive Serb Peasants Blamed for the Destruction of Bosnia

First the Bricks, then the Soul

New Sunday Times
18 October 1992.

By Rohas
(A Bosnian refugee)

ZAGREB: The Serbian academic dissident Bogdan Bogdanovic said:

“Serbian fascism is especially dangerous because it originates in the rural areas, and feels no responsibility for the architecture of towns.”

Their criminal attack on urban areas has been especially directed towards Bosnia-Herzegovinian towns, mainly the Muslim ones of Foca, Visegrad, Zvornik, Sarajevo, Srebrenica, Brcko, and the old towns of Prusac.

Bosniak and Croatian architectures of value in Mostar have been especially attacked and religious buildings — mosques, abbeys, Catholic churches, graveyards, and other sacred places, have become particular targets. Read the rest of this entry »

Court was ready to find Slobodan Milosevic Guilty of Bosnian Genocide

The trial of former Serbian leader, Slobodan Milosevic, would end in a guilty verdict on all 66 counts of genocide and war crimes, had he not died in prison.

Slobodan Milosevic was charged by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia with 66 counts of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes in indictments covering war in Bosnia, Croatia and Kosovo as Yugoslavia disintegrated.

On 11 March 2006, Milosevic died in his cell while being tried for war crimes at the Hague Tribunal. He suffered from a heart condition and high blood pressure. He died only months before a verdict was due in his four-year trial at the Hague. No further action was taken on the case.

However, the Trial Chamber, on 16 June 2004, rejected a defense motion to dismiss the charges against Slobodan Milosevic for lack of evidence, thereby confirming, in accordance with Rule 98bis, that the prosecution case contains sufficient evidence capable of supporting a conviction on all 66 counts, including the genocide against Bosnian Muslims.

In a rule 98bis proceedings on 16 June 2004, the Trial Chamber found, with respect to the specific charges regarding genocide, that:

“(3) the Accused was a participant in a joint criminal enterprise, which included members of the Bosnian Serb leadership, to commit other crimes than genocide and it was reasonably foreseable to him that, as a consequence of the commission of those crimes, genocide of a part of the Bosnian Muslims as a group would be committed by other participants in the joint criminal enterprise, and it was committed;

(4) the Accused aided and abetted or was complicit in the commission of the crime of genocide in that he had knowledge of the joint criminal enterprise, and that he gave its participants substantial assistance, being aware that its aim and intention was the destruction of a part of the Bosnian Muslims as group;

(5) the Accused was a superior to certain persons whom he knew or had reasons to know were about to commit or had committed genocide of a part of the Bosnian Muslims as a group, and he failed to take the necessary measures to prevent the commission of genocide, or punish the perpetrators thereof.”

Rape is "a Weapon of War" in the Bosnian Genocide, European Inquiry

By Alan Riding
9 January 1993.

Ocala Star-Banner,
volume 50. No.131, year 127. p.
(also published in NYT)

A team of European Community investigators has estimated that 20,000 Muslim women have been raped by Bosnian Serb soldiers in recent months as part of a deliberate pattern of abuse aimed at driving them from their homes in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The team said there were indications that some rapes were carried out “in particularly sadistic ways so as to inflict maximum humiliation on the victims.” The report did not elaborate.

It said it had also received strong evidence that “many women, and more particularly children, may have died during or after rape.” The report did not give the range of ages of the victims or say how many might have died. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by genocideinbosnia

December 9, 2010 at 2:37 am

JERUSALEM POST: A look into Bosnian Genocide's notorious concentration camp

Family members of victims of the Omarska concentration camp near the Western Bosnian town of Prijedor hold photos of excavated bodies of their relatives, , during a visit to the site of what once used to be the camp, 06 August, 2006. Photos of the camp and it's prisoners, made in 1992 By the Guardian's Ed Vulliamy, horrified the world's public and drew attention to the fact that ethnic cleansing was being commited at the time in Bosnia, by nationalist forces of Bosnian Serbs.

Family members of victims of the Omarska concentration camp near the Western Bosnian town of Prijedor hold photos of excavated bodies of their relatives, , during a visit to the site of what once used to be the camp, 06 August, 2006. Photos of the camp and it's prisoners, made in 1992 By the Guardian's Ed Vulliamy, horrified the world's public and drew attention to the fact that ethnic cleansing was being commited at the time in Bosnia, by nationalist forces of Bosnian Serbs.

 

First, Muslims and Croats had to wear white bands on their arms

By Tovah Lazaroff, JPost Correspondent in Geneva
Originally published: Apr 26, 2009.
Republished with Permission.

JERUSALEM POST – As an inmate in the Omarska concentration camp in Bosnia, in 1992, Nusreta Sivac began her days by counting the corpses of those who had been killed overnight.

“We would see them on the grass in front of the ‘white house,’ which was a little building where the worst torture was committed,” she told the audience who had gathered on Friday to hear her and other victims of racism, including some from Rwanda. They spoke on the sidelines of the United Nations anti-racism conference that met in Geneva last week.

They sat on a small stage, set off from one of the main corridors in the UN’s European headquarters, at an event titled “Voices: Everyone affected by racism has a story that should be heard.” Read the rest of this entry »