Genocide in Bosnia

Bosnian Genocide, 1992-1995

Posts Tagged ‘Bosnian Serbs

‘Ethnic Cleansing’ Continues in Serb-controlled Bosnia

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A Bosniak family was bomb-attacked by Serb men in Banja Luka… A Croat woman was grabbed from the streets in broad daylight and raped by a gang of Serb men… an elderly Croat woman was attacked in the city center by an assailant who cut off her ears and poked out her eyes… Adina, a 19-year-old Bosniak woman was raped on March 8 by four Serb men in military uniforms…

Gainesville Sun, p.8A
26 March 1994.
By John Pomfret

GASNICI, Croatia — Ismet Hrustanovic had an inkling something was going on in his back yard. The engineer’s puppy started yelping. Twigs and leaves crunched under the heavy feet of men in boots.

Next, a fusillate exploded into his two-story house. One bullet passed through his nose, into his eye socket and out near his ear. Another bored into his wife’s ankle. Several more punched holes in the wall near his 10-year-old son. A final blast killed the puppy.

This is how Hrustanovic, a Muslim [Bosniak], spent Monday, Jan. 31 — hunkered down with a bleeding face while his wife writhed in pain in their modest house in the Serb-held Banja Luka region of Bosnia. On Wednesday, they were evacuated from the region by the United Nations and the International Committee of the Red Cross. Read the rest of this entry »

Serbian Myth of Land 'Ownership' of Bosnia and Herzegovina

Special Report

Map of Bosnia, Ethnic Composition of Bosnia-Herzegovina in 1992

Peace Proposal Provides Serbs Disproportionate Share of Bosnia

By Amira Dzirlo
Washington Report on Middle East Affairs
January/February 1995, Page 16.

The “contact group” draft settlement for Bosnia proposes that the Serbs return to the Bosniaks and Croats about one-third of the Bosnian territory they have occupied. This means that the Serbs would be allowed to keep 49 percent of the territory of Bosnia. These terms have been accepted, reluctantly, by representatives of Bosnia’s Muslims and Croats, but not by the Bosnian Serbs. The unreasonableness of the Serb rejection of the settlement becomes even clearer with a brief review of the history of the Serb land-grab in Bosnia that began during and after World War I.

Among many false Serbian claims in connection with settlement negotiations was the statement that “according to the registry, Serbs own 64 percent of the land of Bosnia-Herzegovina, but they are prepared to return 15 percent of its territory to the Bosniaks out of the total 70 percent which they have captured.”

A Significant Fabrication Read the rest of this entry »

Mid August 1992: Serbs Expel 30,000 Bosniaks and Croats from Northern Bosnia

EMMA DALY Sarajevo
Monday, 23 October 1995
Sarajevo

The trench warfare has stopped – at least for the time being – under the terms of the Bosnian ceasefire brokered by Washington, but there is concern that a campaign against civilians is continuing, particularly in Serb-held northern Bosnia. United Nations officials, who have beseeched the Serb leader, Radovan Karadzic, to adhere to the part of the agreement which requires the humane treatment of civilians, fear for the safety of several thousand Bosniaks [Bosnian Muslims] and Croats [Bosnian Catholics] missing in the area. Read the rest of this entry »

Systematic Rapes of Bosniak Women and Girls in Visegrad

By CHRIS HEDGES
Published: March 25, 1996.

VISEGRAD, Bosnia and Herzegovina, March 21 — For the thousands of Bosniaks who fled from this town in eastern Bosnia, and for the Serbs who remained, the war has bound this generation and the next to a Serbian militia leader named Milan Lukic.

Witnesses and survivors say Mr. Lukic, 29, killed scores of Muslims in this region from 1992 to 1995. He has not been indicted by the United Nations’ war crimes tribunal in The Hague, and the Serbs in Visegrad say they do not know his whereabouts.

Beyond Visegrad, his name and story are largely unknown. But detailed accounts collected during the last two weeks from witnesses, many of them now dispersed around Bosnia, provide a picture of slaughter, pillage and abuse condoned by the local authorities and Serbian commanders from Belgrade. Read the rest of this entry »

Naser Oric, Counter-Attack on Notorious Kravica near Srebrenica

“I am sorry that, as you put it, Serbs feel unhappy and angry. And since I am a soldier, I know that Serbs… true Serbs who are also soldiers, know well that I fought them fair and square on a battlefield. Therefore, I don’t think they are jelaous because of my acquittal; they knew for a long that I was never a war criminal, and that I was a soldier fighting on a battlefield for survival, and nothing else.” – NASER ORIC

Photo: Former commander of Bosniak defenders of Srebrenica, Naser Oric (aka: Nasir Oric), is pictured at the court house of the UN war crimes tribunal on July 3, 2008 in The Hague. Naser Oric was acquitted of all charges against him by the appeals chamber of the United Nations’ war crimes tribunal.

The Judgment in Naser Oric case makes it clear that the Serb village of Kravica was a military base from which Serbs launched cowardly attacks on neighbouring Bosniak villages and the town of Srebrenica itself. The attacks on Bosnian Muslim settlements resulted in a great number of Bosniak victims. Bosniak counter-attack on Kravica was a legitimate defensive measure that followed on the 7 January 1993 as a result of Serb blockade of humanitarian aid and constant attacks on nearby Bosnian Muslim villages. According to the Oric Judgment it was the Serb forces that attacked first – Naser Oric only responded to their attack:

“The fighting intensified in December 1992 and the beginning of January 1993, when Bosnian Muslims were attacked by Bosnian Serbs primarily from the direction of Kravica and Ježestica. In the early morning of the 7 January 1993, Orthodox Christmas day, Bosnian Muslims attacked Kravica, Ježestica and Šiljkovići. Convincing evidence suggests that the village guards were backed by the VRS [Bosnian Serb Army], and following the fighting in the summer of 1992, they received military support, including weapons and training. A considerable amount of weapons and ammunition was kept in Kravica and Šiljkovići. Moreover, there is evidence that besides the village guards, there was Serb and Bosnian Serb military presence in the area. The Trial Chamber is not satisfied that it can be attributed solely to Bosnian Muslims. The evidence is unclear as to the number of houses destroyed by Bosnian Muslims as opposed to those destroyed by Bosnian Serbs. In light of this uncertainty, the Trial Chamber concludes that the destruction of property in Kravica between 7 and 8 December 1992 does not fulfil the elements of wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages not justified by military necessity.”

Written by genocideinbosnia

December 9, 2010 at 5:04 am

JERUSALEM POST: A look into Bosnian Genocide's notorious concentration camp

Family members of victims of the Omarska concentration camp near the Western Bosnian town of Prijedor hold photos of excavated bodies of their relatives, , during a visit to the site of what once used to be the camp, 06 August, 2006. Photos of the camp and it's prisoners, made in 1992 By the Guardian's Ed Vulliamy, horrified the world's public and drew attention to the fact that ethnic cleansing was being commited at the time in Bosnia, by nationalist forces of Bosnian Serbs.

Family members of victims of the Omarska concentration camp near the Western Bosnian town of Prijedor hold photos of excavated bodies of their relatives, , during a visit to the site of what once used to be the camp, 06 August, 2006. Photos of the camp and it's prisoners, made in 1992 By the Guardian's Ed Vulliamy, horrified the world's public and drew attention to the fact that ethnic cleansing was being commited at the time in Bosnia, by nationalist forces of Bosnian Serbs.

 

First, Muslims and Croats had to wear white bands on their arms

By Tovah Lazaroff, JPost Correspondent in Geneva
Originally published: Apr 26, 2009.
Republished with Permission.

JERUSALEM POST – As an inmate in the Omarska concentration camp in Bosnia, in 1992, Nusreta Sivac began her days by counting the corpses of those who had been killed overnight.

“We would see them on the grass in front of the ‘white house,’ which was a little building where the worst torture was committed,” she told the audience who had gathered on Friday to hear her and other victims of racism, including some from Rwanda. They spoke on the sidelines of the United Nations anti-racism conference that met in Geneva last week.

They sat on a small stage, set off from one of the main corridors in the UN’s European headquarters, at an event titled “Voices: Everyone affected by racism has a story that should be heard.” Read the rest of this entry »