Genocide in Bosnia

Bosnian Genocide, 1992-1995

Posts Tagged ‘Bosnian Croats

‘Ethnic Cleansing’ Continues in Serb-controlled Bosnia

leave a comment »

A Bosniak family was bomb-attacked by Serb men in Banja Luka… A Croat woman was grabbed from the streets in broad daylight and raped by a gang of Serb men… an elderly Croat woman was attacked in the city center by an assailant who cut off her ears and poked out her eyes… Adina, a 19-year-old Bosniak woman was raped on March 8 by four Serb men in military uniforms…

Gainesville Sun, p.8A
26 March 1994.
By John Pomfret

GASNICI, Croatia — Ismet Hrustanovic had an inkling something was going on in his back yard. The engineer’s puppy started yelping. Twigs and leaves crunched under the heavy feet of men in boots.

Next, a fusillate exploded into his two-story house. One bullet passed through his nose, into his eye socket and out near his ear. Another bored into his wife’s ankle. Several more punched holes in the wall near his 10-year-old son. A final blast killed the puppy.

This is how Hrustanovic, a Muslim [Bosniak], spent Monday, Jan. 31 — hunkered down with a bleeding face while his wife writhed in pain in their modest house in the Serb-held Banja Luka region of Bosnia. On Wednesday, they were evacuated from the region by the United Nations and the International Committee of the Red Cross. Read the rest of this entry »

Bosniaks in Croat-run Dretelj camp near Čapljina

Bosnian Croat authorities and forces, established, supported and operated a system of ill-treatment, involving a network of prisons, concentration camps and other detention facilities (including, without limitation, the Heliodrom Camp, Ljubuski Prison, Dretelj Prison, Gabela Prison and Vojno Camp) to arrest, detain and imprison thousands of Bosniaks (Bosnian Muslims), including women, children and elderly. Many of the imprisoned and detained Bosniaks were kept in horrible conditions and deprived of basic human necessities, such as adequate food, water and medical care. Many suffered inhumane treatment and physical and psychological abuse, including beatings and sexual assaults. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by genocideinbosnia

January 14, 2011 at 8:17 pm

Serbian Myth of Land 'Ownership' of Bosnia and Herzegovina

Special Report

Map of Bosnia, Ethnic Composition of Bosnia-Herzegovina in 1992

Peace Proposal Provides Serbs Disproportionate Share of Bosnia

By Amira Dzirlo
Washington Report on Middle East Affairs
January/February 1995, Page 16.

The “contact group” draft settlement for Bosnia proposes that the Serbs return to the Bosniaks and Croats about one-third of the Bosnian territory they have occupied. This means that the Serbs would be allowed to keep 49 percent of the territory of Bosnia. These terms have been accepted, reluctantly, by representatives of Bosnia’s Muslims and Croats, but not by the Bosnian Serbs. The unreasonableness of the Serb rejection of the settlement becomes even clearer with a brief review of the history of the Serb land-grab in Bosnia that began during and after World War I.

Among many false Serbian claims in connection with settlement negotiations was the statement that “according to the registry, Serbs own 64 percent of the land of Bosnia-Herzegovina, but they are prepared to return 15 percent of its territory to the Bosniaks out of the total 70 percent which they have captured.”

A Significant Fabrication Read the rest of this entry »

Mass Grave in Bosnia Holds 540 Bodies of Muslims and Catholics

By: Maud S. Beelman
24 September 1995.

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) – A mass grave filled with 540 bodies was unearthed in northwestern Bosnia after government forces recaptured the area from rebel Serbs, Bosnia’s prime minister said Saturday.

It was unclear whose bodies were in the grave, but they were believed to be Muslims [Bosniaks] and Croats killed by Bosnian Serbs, said Prime Minister Haris Silajdzic.

The discovery coincided with word of the latest ethnic expulsion by Bosnian Serbs: the driving of almost 500 Muslims [Bosniaks] from another Serb-held town under government attack. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by genocideinbosnia

January 4, 2011 at 3:28 am

Mid August 1992: Serbs Expel 30,000 Bosniaks and Croats from Northern Bosnia

EMMA DALY Sarajevo
Monday, 23 October 1995
Sarajevo

The trench warfare has stopped – at least for the time being – under the terms of the Bosnian ceasefire brokered by Washington, but there is concern that a campaign against civilians is continuing, particularly in Serb-held northern Bosnia. United Nations officials, who have beseeched the Serb leader, Radovan Karadzic, to adhere to the part of the agreement which requires the humane treatment of civilians, fear for the safety of several thousand Bosniaks [Bosnian Muslims] and Croats [Bosnian Catholics] missing in the area. Read the rest of this entry »

JERUSALEM POST: A look into Bosnian Genocide's notorious concentration camp

Family members of victims of the Omarska concentration camp near the Western Bosnian town of Prijedor hold photos of excavated bodies of their relatives, , during a visit to the site of what once used to be the camp, 06 August, 2006. Photos of the camp and it's prisoners, made in 1992 By the Guardian's Ed Vulliamy, horrified the world's public and drew attention to the fact that ethnic cleansing was being commited at the time in Bosnia, by nationalist forces of Bosnian Serbs.

Family members of victims of the Omarska concentration camp near the Western Bosnian town of Prijedor hold photos of excavated bodies of their relatives, , during a visit to the site of what once used to be the camp, 06 August, 2006. Photos of the camp and it's prisoners, made in 1992 By the Guardian's Ed Vulliamy, horrified the world's public and drew attention to the fact that ethnic cleansing was being commited at the time in Bosnia, by nationalist forces of Bosnian Serbs.

 

First, Muslims and Croats had to wear white bands on their arms

By Tovah Lazaroff, JPost Correspondent in Geneva
Originally published: Apr 26, 2009.
Republished with Permission.

JERUSALEM POST – As an inmate in the Omarska concentration camp in Bosnia, in 1992, Nusreta Sivac began her days by counting the corpses of those who had been killed overnight.

“We would see them on the grass in front of the ‘white house,’ which was a little building where the worst torture was committed,” she told the audience who had gathered on Friday to hear her and other victims of racism, including some from Rwanda. They spoke on the sidelines of the United Nations anti-racism conference that met in Geneva last week.

They sat on a small stage, set off from one of the main corridors in the UN’s European headquarters, at an event titled “Voices: Everyone affected by racism has a story that should be heard.” Read the rest of this entry »